Co-Management

Working together
Through a number of boards, consisting of a variety of members from all interested parties, the department of Lands and Natural Resources takes part in the co-management of a variety of Nunatsiavut’s interests.

Torngat Wildlife & Plants Co-Management Board
The Torngat Wildlife and Plants Co-Management Board is a public body made up of seven members, including the chairperson. Members are appointed as follows: three members by the Nunatsiavut Government; two members by the Provincial Minister; one member by the Federal Minister. The Chairperson is nominated by the other members and appointed by the Provincial Minister.

The Board has the power to establish, when necessary, total allowable harvests for all species of wildlife, other than migratory birds and caribou, and plants. This power is subject to ministerial disallowance. The board may also recommend the total allowable harvests for caribou and migratory birds to the relevant minister.

The board may recommend conservation and management measures for wildlife, plants, and habitat, and provide advice and recommendations to the federal, provincial, and Nunatsiavut governments on all other matters related to the management of wildlife and plants in the Labrador Inuit Settlement Area.

For more information about the Torngat Wildlife & Plants Co-Management Board, please visit the Torngat Secretariat website.

Torngat Joint Fisheries Board
The Torngat Joint Fisheries Board is a public body made up of seven members, including the Chairperson. Members are appointed as follows: three members by the Nunatsiavut Government; two members by the Federal Minister; one member by the Provincial Minister. The Chairperson is nominated by the other members and appointed by the Federal Minister.

The Torngat Joint Fisheries Board is an advisory board to the responsible Ministers. It will be the primary body making recommendations to the responsible Minister about the conservation of fish and fish habitat and about the management of fisheries in the Labrador Inuit Settlement Area, other than the Inuit domestic fishery and the Inuit domestic harvest level. Recommendations of the board can include measures respecting recreational fishing and the criteria for issuing commercial fishing licences and fish processing licences.

For more information about the Torngat Joint Fisheries Board, please visit the Torngat Secretariat website.

Torngat Mountains National Park Co-Management Board
The Torngat Mountain National Park Co-Management Board is made up of seven members, including the Chairperson. Members are appointed as follows:

two members by Nunatsiavut Government, two members by Makivik Corporation, two members by Parks Canada, and an independent Chairperson. Currently, all members of the Co-Management Board (CMB) are Inuit.

The CMB may provide advice to the Torngat Wildlife and Plant Co-Management Board, the Torngat Joint Fisheries Board, the Nunatsiavut Government, and to other agencies on all matters related to management of the National Park and any other matters related to the National Park for which its advice is requested.

The CMB may provide advice to the Minister on all matters related to management of the National Park Reserve, by any appropriate means.

Voisey’s Bay Environmental Management Board
The Voisey’s Bay Environmental Management Board (VBEMB) arose from the signing of the Voisey’s Bay Environmental Management Agreement between the Labrador Inuit Association; the governments of Canada and Newfoundland and Labrador; and the Innu Nation. The VBEMB is an advisory board whose purpose is to provide effective, responsible, and coordinated environmental management of the Voisey’s Bay mine and mill.

Voisey’s Bay Impact and Benefit Agreement
VBNC (now Vale Inco) and Labrador Inuit Association (now Nunatsiavut Government) signed an Impact and Benefit Agreement (IBA) on July 29, 2002. This IBA provides a number of commitments and is a tool which builds relationships with Aboriginal communities, is a mechanism for the company to provide benefits from the project, embodies the Aboriginal collectives’ consent to the project, and formally recognizes the relationship and each party’s commitments.

Nunatsiavut Government has an IBA coordinator who oversees the implementation of the IBA.